PAUL CADDEN’S PHOTOREALISM HAND DRAWN ART


These might look like photographs, but it’s not all black and white when it comes to the work of this artist. Despite looking like they have been captured on a camera, these are actually hand-drawn images created by hyperrealist artist Paul Cadden. The 47-year-old, from Scotland, is able to recreate photos in amazing detail, often just using only a pencil. From the wrinkles on a woman’s face, a puff of smoke from a cigarette or dripping water  Cadden’s drawings look unbelievably realistic. Incredible detail has been captured by the hyperrealist artist Paul Cadden, but his work leaves you wondering whether your eyes have been tricked. Hyperrealism was born from the idea of photorealism, which are paintings based on photographs but created in a non-photographic medium. Taking an average of between three and six weeks to produce, Cadden creates about seven pieces each year  which usually come in A1 or A0 sizes – and sell at galleries for up to £5,000 each. A spokesman for London’s Plus One Gallery, which is featuring Cadden’s work in its current hyperrealism exhibition, said: ‘When you look at a picture of his work, they do look like photographs. ‘But when you see it in a gallery up close, you can tell it’s a drawing. The detail is incredible.’ Cadden, from Glasgow, was last year shortlisted for Artist of the Year 2011 for his drawing, ‘Painted context’. I think the creation of Art need not lead to alienation and can indeed be highly satisfying; one pours one’s subjectivity into an object and one can even gain enjoyment from the fact that another in turn gains enjoyment from this. Although the drawings and paintings I make are based upon photographs, videos stills etc , the idea is to go beyond  the  photograph. The photo is used to create a subtler and much more complex focus on the subject depicted, The virtual image becomes the living image, an intensification of the normal. These objects and scenes in my drawings are meticulously detailed to create the illusion of a new reality not seen in in the original photo.The Hyperrealist style focuses much more on its emphasis on detail and the subjects depicted. Hyperreal paintings and sculptures are not strict interpretations of photographs, nor are they literal illustrations of a particular scene or subject. Instead, they utilise additional, often subtle, pictorial elements to create the illusion of a reality which in fact either does not exist or cannot be seen by the human eye. Furthermore, they may incorporate emotional, social, cultural and political thematic elements as an extension of the painted visual illusion; a distinct departure from the older and considerably more literal school of Photorealism”.


www.paulcadden.com

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